75th baby born in 2013 welcomed by March of Dimes and Trident Hospital

  • Tuesday, February 5, 2013

Eli Reedy is being held by his mother Gwen Reedy. Meredith Repik, Executive Director of the March of Dimes Lowcountry Division is at right. Eli was the 75th baby born at a hospital in South Carolina in 2013, the 75th year of March of Dimes. Eli was born at Summerville Medical Center on January 22. PROVIDED

Eli Reedy, the 75th baby born at Summerville Medical Center this year has a better chance for a long and healthy life than earlier generations, thanks to 75 years of health advances, made possible in part by the March of Dimes. Eli Reedy was born on January 22, 2013. 2013 marks the 75th anniversary of the March of Dimes, and the organization is honoring the 75th baby born at hospitals throughout South Carolina.
The March of Dimes says babies born in 2013 will live longer and are less likely to have a birth defect than those born 75 years ago. They are also much less likely to die from an infectious disease thanks to widespread use of vaccinations to prevent polio, rubella, measles and several other infections.
“The birth of every baby is a joy and something to celebrate,” said Meredith Repik for the March of Dimes. “Babies, such as Eli who are born in this March of Dimes Anniversary year, represent how far we have come in infant health – and how much more we can do for our babies. We’re thrilled to be working together with Trident Hospital toward a day when every baby gets a healthy start in life. We also invite families and businesses to join us for March for Babies in Charleston on April 27, 2013. Visit www.marchforbabies.org to register now or call 843-614-3355 for more information.”
The March of Dimes was founded in January 1938 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. A polio sufferer himself, FDR founded the organization to “lead, direct and unify” the fight against polio. The March of Dimes funded the development of the Salk vaccine, which was tested in 1954 and licensed a year later, as well as the Sabin vaccine which became available in 1962. Nearly all babies born today still receive this lifesaving injection. More information about March of Dimes history can be found at marchofdimes.com/75.
Today, about 4 million babies are born in the United States each year and the March of Dimes helps each and every one of them through its history of research, education, vaccines and breakthroughs. Babies born in 2013 can expect to live about 78 years, 14 years longer than an infant born in 1938, when the life expectancy was only 64. They are also almost 8 times less likely to die in infancy.
Babies born next year also will be screened for 31 genetic, metabolic, hormonal and/or functional conditions, including PKU (phenylketonuria) within the first hours of birth. March of Dimes grantee Dr. Robert Guthrie developed the mass PKU test, the first of many newborn screening tests infants now receive, and allowed for prevention of intellectual disabilities through diet. Today, every baby born in every state in the U.S. receives screening for dozens of conditions that could cause catastrophic health problems or death if not detected and then treated promptly at birth.
Many serious birth defects have declined over these 75 years. For example, neural tube defects or NTDs (birth defects of the brain and spine) have decreased by nearly one-third since 1998, when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration mandated that grain foods such as bread and pasta be fortified with folic acid.
Today, the March of Dimes is working to prevent the epidemic of premature birth, which affects nearly a half million babies every year. Through Strong Start, a partnership with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the March of Dimes has been getting out the word that “Healthy Babies Are Worth the Wait.” The campaign urges women to wait for labor to begin on its own if their pregnancy is healthy, rather than scheduling delivery before 39 completed weeks of pregnancy.
In 2013, the March of Dimes celebrates its 75th Anniversary and its ongoing work to help babies get a healthy start in life. Early research led to the Salk and Sabin polio vaccines that all babies still receive. Other breakthroughs include new treatments for premature infants and children with birth defects. About 4 million babies are born each year in the United States, and all have benefitted from March of Dimes lifesaving research and education.

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