“This is just the next step and I think it’s going to be a major one for all of us,” he said.
The groundbreaking was for a 100,000-square-foot, Class A, Gold LEED-certified office building near the northern intersection of I-26 and U.S. 17-A.
It’s the first building in almost 5,000 acres of development – 400 acres along I-26 within the town limits of Summerville, and 4,500 acres in unincorporated Berkeley County.
The development will include office space, retail and housing, with the village of Brighton Park beginning construction in 2014 and a new elementary school expected to be ready in the fall of 2014.
A Marriott Courtyard Hotel, one of the first to be LEED certified in the U.S., will begin construction in the next three to four months.
“At the moment you see a lot of dirt, but hopefully you see the skeleton, the bones of things to come,” said Kenneth Seeger, senior vice president and president of community development and land management at MWV.
He said the community would enjoy “world-class technology,” the latest in fiber networks, and the ability to live, work and shop in the same area.
“This is something we’re all going to be proud of,” said Berkeley County Supervisor Dan Davis.
The Sheep Island interchange, which should be complete in 2015, was instrumental in opening the way for the development, he said.
It will open up miles for development, Davis said.
Ed Guiltinan, vice president of development and leasing with The Rockefeller Group, said Nexton will give people the opportunity to walk from their office to lunch, shops and doctor or dentist appointments.
He invited everyone to the ribbon-cutting in about a year.
“We’re confident you’ll be very pleased by what you see,” he said.
After the ceremonial groundbreaking, Chamber Chair Nancyjean Nettles said the development is a huge draw for Summerville.
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Nexton breaks ground

  • Thursday, February 21, 2013

A rendering of the development planned at the intersection of I-26 and U.S. 17-A. LESLIE CANTU/JOURNAL SCENE

 MeadWestvaco has a long and positive history in Summerville, Mayor Bill Collins said, and Wednesday’s groundbreaking at its Nexton development is a “game-changer.”
“This is just the next step and I think it’s going to be a major one for all of us,” he said.
The groundbreaking was for a 100,000-square-foot, Class A, Gold LEED-certified office building near the northern intersection of I-26 and U.S. 17-A.
It’s the first building in almost 5,000 acres of development – 400 acres along I-26 within the town limits of Summerville, and 4,500 acres in unincorporated Berkeley County.
The development will include office space, retail and housing, with the village of Brighton Park beginning construction in 2014 and a new elementary school expected to be ready in the fall of 2014.
A Marriott Courtyard Hotel, one of the first to be LEED certified in the U.S., will begin construction in the next three to four months.
“At the moment you see a lot of dirt, but hopefully you see the skeleton, the bones of things to come,” said Kenneth Seeger, senior vice president and president of community development and land management at MWV.
He said the community would enjoy “world-class technology,” the latest in fiber networks, and the ability to live, work and shop in the same area.
“This is something we’re all going to be proud of,” said Berkeley County Supervisor Dan Davis.
The Sheep Island interchange, which should be complete in 2015, was instrumental in opening the way for the development, he said.
It will open up miles for development, Davis said.
Ed Guiltinan, vice president of development and leasing with The Rockefeller Group, said Nexton will give people the opportunity to walk from their office to lunch, shops and doctor or dentist appointments.
He invited everyone to the ribbon-cutting in about a year.
“We’re confident you’ll be very pleased by what you see,” he said.
After the ceremonial groundbreaking, Chamber Chair Nancyjean Nettles said the development is a huge draw for Summerville.

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