In business this may be a client, visitor, boss, or an elderly person. A failure to acknowledge the respect someone has earned is considered impolite. By showing someone else consideration in this way, you also show esteem for yourself.
 
A simple, yet powerful way to show deference to someone is to stand to say hello and shake his/her hand. This applies to men and women in business.
 
Deference is the protocol of correctly recognizing a person; an appreciated recognition seldom verbalized, but silently acknowledged and remembered.
 
The Charleston School of Protocol and Etiquette specializes in teaching confidence, helping people handle life's events and changes with style, savvy and polish. We offer seminars, books, online programs, and consulting services in business etiquette, and programs for medical office protocol. Ms. Grosso also certifies people to teach tea etiquette. For more information, please visit: www.charlestonschoolofprotocol.com
 
 
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Manners Matter

  • Thursday, February 21, 2013

Deference as defined by Webster’s New World Dictionary is: “out of regard or respect for honor”. When you show deference to someone, you are yielding to that person out of reverence for his or her position, role or age.
 
In business this may be a client, visitor, boss, or an elderly person. A failure to acknowledge the respect someone has earned is considered impolite. By showing someone else consideration in this way, you also show esteem for yourself.
 
A simple, yet powerful way to show deference to someone is to stand to say hello and shake his/her hand. This applies to men and women in business.
 
Deference is the protocol of correctly recognizing a person; an appreciated recognition seldom verbalized, but silently acknowledged and remembered.
 
The Charleston School of Protocol and Etiquette specializes in teaching confidence, helping people handle life's events and changes with style, savvy and polish. We offer seminars, books, online programs, and consulting services in business etiquette, and programs for medical office protocol. Ms. Grosso also certifies people to teach tea etiquette. For more information, please visit: www.charlestonschoolofprotocol.com
 
 

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