Sanford won the First Congressional District seat with 54 percent of the vote and almost 32 percent of voters coming to the polls.
Elizabeth Colbert Busch got 45 percent of the vote. Though Sanford won in all counties, she came closest to a win in Charleston County, where she took 49 percent of the vote.
Dorchester and Berkeley counties, however, overwhelmingly favored Sanford, with 60 percent of Dorchester voters and 61 percent of Berkeley voters selecting him.
Wednesday, Sanford posted a thank-you message on his website.
“This race was about people across the Lowcountry recognizing that this country cannot continue down the path it is on financially without some disastrous consequences,” he said.
“So while the battle for this campaign is behind us, a larger and more significant battle is ahead with regard to the future of our nation,” he continued.
That's what Vicki Vincent at Fort Dorchester Elementary School was looking for.
“He'll do what he says, which is change things,” she said.†
“I didn't want to vote for Pelosi and the Democrats. I could care less about his personal life. … Results are what I'm after,” said Donald Cook.
At DuBose Middle School, Linda Field also cast a vote for Sanford.
“I feel with his experience, and with the issues we have facing us, that he's the better candidate,” she said.
At Summerville Church of Christ, Paul Drago also voted for Sanford.
“As far as I'm concerned, he's a proven entity,” Drago said.
Some women at Bethany United Methodist Church, however, said they didn't trust Sanford.
“Sanford abandoned the state of South Carolina … You don't just disapper from the country. It's too big of a mistake, or poor choice, to overlook,” said Georgann Gentry.
Kathy Spencer said she felt the same way. In addition, she really liked Colbert Busch.
There should be more women in office, she said.

" />

Sanford headed to Washington

  • Thursday, May 9, 2013

Former Gov. Mark Sanford addresses an excited crowd Tuesday night at his victory party. AP

Photos

Voters on Tuesday decided to send former Gov. Mark Sanford back to Congress, disregarding his personal problems in favor of his fiscal message.
Sanford won the First Congressional District seat with 54 percent of the vote and almost 32 percent of voters coming to the polls.
Elizabeth Colbert Busch got 45 percent of the vote. Though Sanford won in all counties, she came closest to a win in Charleston County, where she took 49 percent of the vote.
Dorchester and Berkeley counties, however, overwhelmingly favored Sanford, with 60 percent of Dorchester voters and 61 percent of Berkeley voters selecting him.
Wednesday, Sanford posted a thank-you message on his website.
“This race was about people across the Lowcountry recognizing that this country cannot continue down the path it is on financially without some disastrous consequences,” he said.
“So while the battle for this campaign is behind us, a larger and more significant battle is ahead with regard to the future of our nation,” he continued.
That's what Vicki Vincent at Fort Dorchester Elementary School was looking for.
“He'll do what he says, which is change things,” she said.†
“I didn't want to vote for Pelosi and the Democrats. I could care less about his personal life. … Results are what I'm after,” said Donald Cook.
At DuBose Middle School, Linda Field also cast a vote for Sanford.
“I feel with his experience, and with the issues we have facing us, that he's the better candidate,” she said.
At Summerville Church of Christ, Paul Drago also voted for Sanford.
“As far as I'm concerned, he's a proven entity,” Drago said.
Some women at Bethany United Methodist Church, however, said they didn't trust Sanford.
“Sanford abandoned the state of South Carolina … You don't just disapper from the country. It's too big of a mistake, or poor choice, to overlook,” said Georgann Gentry.
Kathy Spencer said she felt the same way. In addition, she really liked Colbert Busch.
There should be more women in office, she said.

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