This professionally juried contest is conducted by the 50th Anniversary National Wilderness Planning Team (Wilderness50), Nature’s Best Photography, and the Smithsonian Institution, and will run through September 3.
Professional, amateur and student photographers are encouraged to submit their†photographs accompanied by personal stories and memories about the scenes†depicted. Contest guidelines and entry instructions are found online at http://www.naturesbestphotography.com/wilderness.
Approximately 50 winning contest entries will be chosen for display as large format prints in the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History as part of a 2014 exhibition celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act.
“Photography delivers immediate and long-lasting impact. What better way to celebrate
the beauty and diversity of nature than through the eyes of the public and their shared experiences in our wilderness areas,” says Steve Freligh, Nature’s Best Photography Editor-in-Chief, and† “Wilderness Forever” contest judge.
“We're excited to share the public’s own visions of America’s beautiful wilderness lands
and to educate visitors about the importance of preserving our natural heritage through this remarkable photography exhibition,” says Charles Chen of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.
Entry Categories are as follows:
  • Scenic Landscape: Dramatic scenes and unusual perspectives of protected wilderness land, providing expansive views, including plant life: flowers, trees, and other flora in natural habitat. Close-ups, wide-open spaces, storms, sunsets, and†other natural views.
  • Wildlife: Wild animals (mammals, reptiles, amphibians, birds, insects, etc.)†photographed within the boundaries of wilderness areas. Animal portraits, behavior, predation, adults with young. (NOTE: No captive animals allowed in this category.)
  • People in Wilderness: People enjoying wilderness lands: Adventurers,†backpackers, hikers, canoers and other activities; groups, families, and individuals†in natural settings. Action, artistic perspectives and artistic compositions (silhouettes, motion shots, creative lighting, portrayals of solitude and primitive recreation etc.)
  • Most Inspirational Moment: Images of wilderness locations that have a very special†story and personal meaning to entrants.†


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National photo contest opens

  • Wednesday, June 26, 2013

The “Wilderness Forever”†public photography competition is accepting entries of images illustrating the sheer majesty, diversity, and value of our nation’s wilderness areas.
This professionally juried contest is conducted by the 50th Anniversary National Wilderness Planning Team (Wilderness50), Nature’s Best Photography, and the Smithsonian Institution, and will run through September 3.
Professional, amateur and student photographers are encouraged to submit their†photographs accompanied by personal stories and memories about the scenes†depicted. Contest guidelines and entry instructions are found online at http://www.naturesbestphotography.com/wilderness.
Approximately 50 winning contest entries will be chosen for display as large format prints in the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History as part of a 2014 exhibition celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act.
“Photography delivers immediate and long-lasting impact. What better way to celebrate
the beauty and diversity of nature than through the eyes of the public and their shared experiences in our wilderness areas,” says Steve Freligh, Nature’s Best Photography Editor-in-Chief, and† “Wilderness Forever” contest judge.
“We're excited to share the public’s own visions of America’s beautiful wilderness lands
and to educate visitors about the importance of preserving our natural heritage through this remarkable photography exhibition,” says Charles Chen of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.
Entry Categories are as follows:
Scenic Landscape: Dramatic scenes and unusual perspectives of protected wilderness land, providing expansive views, including plant life: flowers, trees, and other flora in natural habitat. Close-ups, wide-open spaces, storms, sunsets, and†other natural views.Wildlife: Wild animals (mammals, reptiles, amphibians, birds, insects, etc.)†photographed within the boundaries of wilderness areas. Animal portraits, behavior, predation, adults with young. (NOTE: No captive animals allowed in this category.)People in Wilderness: People enjoying wilderness lands: Adventurers,†backpackers, hikers, canoers and other activities; groups, families, and individuals†in natural settings. Action, artistic perspectives and artistic compositions (silhouettes, motion shots, creative lighting, portrayals of solitude and primitive recreation etc.)Most Inspirational Moment: Images of wilderness locations that have a very special†story and personal meaning to entrants.††

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