Scott visits Gregg 7th graders

  • Friday, October 25, 2013

Photographs by A.M. Sheehan/Journal Scene U.S. Senator Tim Scott speaks one on one with Gregg Middle School students Monday, during a brief visit to the school.

Photos

U.S. Senator Tim Scott stopped by Gregg Middle School Monday, to have a brief chat with seventh grade students.

He was there to speak to them about motivation.

Within a few short minutes he proved he could be a stand-up comedian whenever his political career gets boring. He maintained the attention of all the youngsters for the full half hour he was there. Very briefly he told them how he got to the senate beginning with his eighth grade run for a seat on the student council.

“The student council was the once place I could go and talk and not get in trouble,” he said.

He told them how, when he got to high school, he became disenfranchised, became a “challenge to the teachers” and dropped out and how his mom “encouraged” him to go back.

Scott grew up in North Charleston. His mom was a single mom. Once he went back to high school, he set goals for himself, beginning with the goal of going to college.

“I was the first kid in my family to go to college.”

“I learned a valuable lesson…goals have value.”

“I knew I wanted to get a football scholarship [to college] and go into politics.” He did both.

Using jokes and similes, he likened a person without goals to a boat without a rudder.

“Every single person in this room has an amazing future ahead of them. You might be the next great doctor, actor, president, scientist…but to achieve your potential you need to set goals and work toward them.”

Scott then opened the floor to questions and he got some tough ones. “How did he feel about the government shut-down? How was the government going to get bipartisan fiscal responsibility by the end of the fiscal year? Is his job stressful? How does the government help the rest of the world?”

Some he answered directly, some he hedged on, but regardless he managed to engage the students and by the end of his time with them, almost all were waving their hands in the air hoping to get their question heard.

Prior to leaving, he managed to shake the many hands of kids that were reaching toward him.

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