Celebrating the flag

  • Friday, June 20, 2014

Meagan Sharpe/Journal Scene Colton Thomas, 4, practices folding the flag with Rick Coakley.


The flag was the focus June 18 at the library, when dozens of children got hands-on instruction in the history and care for the American flag.

The Rotary Club sponsored the “Celebrate America” event, tied to Flag Day, at the Summerville branch of the Dorchester County library.

“We’re going to teach you about Flag Day and what the Pledge of Allegiance means,” said Frank Bouknight, president of the club.

The event first began with a video from 1969, starring comedian Red Skelton explaining what it means to say the Pledge of Allegiance.

Once the video ended, members of the National Boy Scouts of America brought in the flag and everyone recited the Pledge of Allegiance.

Mike Bogart, a member of the Rotary Club, then gave a short history of Flag Day after the pledge.

Bogart said the first Flag Day celebration was June 14, 1855, and in 1949 President Truman declared June 14 as the nation’s official Flag Day.

Afterward, the children were quizzed on the video, the history of the flag and their basic knowledge.

The questions were based on how the children would act when they saw the American flag in public on different occasions.

Members of the Rotary Club participated, answering the questions wrong on purpose. The children loved the interaction and enjoyed correcting the adults on their mistakes.

Then, members of the Rotary Club taught the children how to properly fold the flag. When the flag demonstrations and practices were over, the children got to choose from a folded American flag, a Veteran’s Day book, a patriotic DVD, or a book about the American Flag.

“It was fun,” said Carter, a child who attended from the YMCA.

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